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Reduce, Reuse, Recycle and the Missing R

Reduce, Reuse and Recycle get a lot of attention already, but until our refrigerator stopped working last week, we never considered a fourth possibility: Repair.

We inherited the original refrigerator that was installed in our house when it was built in 1989. It’s a Subzero, which turns out to be long lasting, built in the USA and designed to keep food longer than the typical refrigerator design. So after 23 years of operation, she stopped cooling and we were lucky to have another refrigerator in the garage that we crammed all our food into temporarily.  The technician’s quote to repair it made it financially obvious to get rid of the Subzero and get a new refrigerator.  But we had to weigh the other options.

We’ve been trained in our culture that if it doesn’t work or is inconvenient, it is acceptable to throw it away and get a new one (this applies to relationships as well).  And to feel good about throwing things away, we try more than ever to donate (reuse) or recycle items. In our case, all the options we could choose to get rid of this appliance didn’t provide a 100% guarantee that it would be completely recycled. We didn’t like those options.

For us, Repair was the opportunity to avoid sending all or part of this 500 pound appliance into a landfill and that the only thing it would take is creating some additional income over and beyond our budget.  Repair upholds all our commitments to our family, the environment, and forwarding the use of reusable straws in the world. So we’ve made our choice and we are going to Repair our refrigerator.

So we are turning to you for some support. If you are inspired to help us repair and save our refrigerator and want some new straws in the process, we’ve got a “Thanks For Saving Our Fridge” special for you!  Use coupon code  THX4SOF to get 25% off anything in our online store through Friday, August 10th Sunday, August 12th. There’s no minimum order and it can be used by anyone placing an order online. Note that the coupon code goes on the View Cart page to the right of your cart.

Also, if you leave a comment below sharing something (even a relationship) you’ve repaired instead of throwing away and the positive outcome of your choice, you’ll be eligible to win one of  two 10″ decorative smoothie straws (artist’s choice) we’ll give away on Friday, August 10th Sunday, August 12th to two random comments.

Much love,
~Daedra and Brian

Comments (84)

  1. I bought a pitcher made of pottery when I lived in Bulgaria. After I got married, my husband broke it when I was moving into his house. I repaired it with glue and I still have it.

    Donna Hays
    Aug 7, 2012 Reply
  2. Me! I know it Might sound like an Odd/off topic answer…but ME!…I’m a lil over 40 and I spent over 30yrs of my life dealing w/physical,emotional abuse and memories of sexual abuse….I feel like I’m finally in the process of kinda recycling me ? ..I mean letting go of the past learning to like me and forgive me soo I can finally be used to be the person i was always meant to be ..an Artist and a lifter up of others…its ok if i don’t Win..felt good to say it any way 😉
    Thanks

    Tiger Sutton
    Aug 7, 2012 Reply
  3. This was sort of recycling someone elses trash, but my husband was leaving the hockey rink and saw a broken hockey stick next to the trash–he decided to repurpose it as a hockey stick for my 4 year old by sawing off the sharp edge and adding some hockey tape to the end. Perfect fit!!!

    Lynn
    Aug 7, 2012 Reply
  4. Whenever I notice rips in clothing, I always pull out the needle and thread. If the rip irreparable, the piece is repuposed into pot holders, rags, etc.

    Nancy C.
    Aug 7, 2012 Reply
  5. I repaired a purse. a bookcase fell on my purse, clutch shape and the handle was metal so it was really mangled. I banged it out with a hammer and was able to use it for 4 more years! and I got compliments on it every week.

    Karissa
    Aug 7, 2012 Reply
  6. My husband’s work was going to throw away some old laptops, and he rescued one and put a new $60 hard drive in it. It’s kind of the functional equivalent of a netbook, great to have on the couch! I’m typing on it now!

    Melanie
    Aug 7, 2012 Reply
  7. Our washing machine was shutting down and giving us various failure codes. Rather than replace the central control unit, my husband did a little research and resoldered a few connections to keep the machine working, save us money, and avoid throwing more electronics in the landfill.

    Amy
    Aug 8, 2012 Reply
  8. I’ve taken broken pieces of crayons and melted them down into “new” crayons for my kids:)

    Ashley Hipkin
    Aug 8, 2012 Reply
  9. I find myself ‘repairing’ instead of replacing items in my home to make it work for my future disabled body (Nothing Less, Cure ALS). The couch that is too low is getting taller legs. The dining chairs are getting repurposed into a dining bench. The cabinet shelves are being modified into pull out drawers. Oh so many little changes.

    zzipper
    Aug 9, 2012 Reply
  10. I have a couple of cats and dogs that are recycled. They were beought to my area from areas where puppy mills are turning out too many dogs. We take them in, fall in love with them, train them, feed them and enjoy them. Cats are a little easier as there isnt much training involved. We also spay and neuter as there are so many used animals that need love there is no sense in producing more

    Carol
    Aug 9, 2012 Reply
    • That’s great Carol. I wish all puppy mills would be shut down. They keep the animals in horrible conditions and keep breeding and breeding as animals die daily in shelters and on the street. I really admire your contribution to curbing the problem.

      Marcy
      Aug 10, 2012 Reply
  11. I’ve repaired so many things over the years – and pride myself on having gotten almost all of my children’s clothes second hand. I love using things that still have lots of life left in them instead of buying new.

    Cathy
    Aug 9, 2012 Reply
  12. Our dryer stopped drying clothes a few months back. Instead of buying a new one my handy husband went to the hardware store and bought a new heating element for it. It cost about $35 bucks. Dryer now works as well as it did when we first got it.

    Gianna
    Aug 9, 2012 Reply
  13. Do cloth diapers count? I wash them and reuse them instead of buying disposables that will sit in landfills.
    Also we fix our old cars instead of buying new ones. Currently my door handle won’t open from the inside. Yeah, they have a lot of miles on them but a little duct tape goes a long way. 😉

    zanna b.
    Aug 9, 2012 Reply
  14. I love my cat Lennon, but I don’t love that his affinity for string-like things resulted in him chewing the cord of my brand new earbuds! I took them into my local hackerspace where they helped me learn how to repair the cord myself. 🙂

    Rebekah
    Aug 9, 2012 Reply
  15. My husband and son have been working on restoring/repairing a 1980 Pontiac Firebird. It has been a wonderful father/son bonding project and is teaching my son all sorts of life lessons!

    Teresa Novakovich
    Aug 9, 2012 Reply
  16. I recycle pop bottles turning them into banks, flower pots, cord organizers, craft caddies. I don’t buy those bottles my neighbors give me bags full, which do not see a land fill.

    Beth B
    Aug 9, 2012 Reply
  17. I got a sewing machine for Christmas this year (Thanks, Mom!) and I have started repairing clothing! It seems like women’s clothing is so shoddy these days, but a little thread and elbow grease can go a long way with them! My most recent project was a pair of leggings that were coming apart at the hems and seams. Like new!

    Pangie
    Aug 9, 2012 Reply
  18. Our van is from 1998. It has been through several repairs in it’s long life…at a few points in the last few years we could have chosen to let it go and get something new. Our plan at this point is to continue to repair it when necessary as long as it’s a suitable vehicle for our family. It’s old and no longer pretty, but it’s been quite reliable and still has a lot of life left. There is only a short time more we’ll need this large of a vehicle… we don’t want to put another one on the road. LIkely when we’re finished with it- when we’re able to use a smaller, greener vehicle, we’ll donate it so that a family needing a larger vehicle has it.

    Aug 9, 2012 Reply
  19. Thanks to the internet, I was able to diagnose and fix my dishwasher and refrigerator. Saved me lots of money! They were easy to fix that actually cost me no money! It doesn’t hurt to check out the internet to see if it’s something you can fix on your own. 🙂

    Sally
    Aug 9, 2012 Reply
  20. I have a laser printer that’s about 11 years old. It only cost around $100 or $150 and the replacement toner cartridges are $75, though I’m only on my third cartridge overall. Last winter the printed stopped feeding paper. I figured I’d probably need to get rid of it and agonized over whether to get something better and nicer that would work with my iPad or just something until we figured out what will replace our 7 yr old laptop. One day I Googled the printer model and came across a step by step tutorial of how to flip the rubber ring around the paper feeding drum so it would again pick up paper. I figured I had nothing to lose by trying this as the printer wasn’t working anyway though it did make me nervous to unscrew things that I’m sure only authorized technicians are supposed to! Anyway – the fix worked and our printer is like new again! I’m so glad I gave it a shot

    Lisa
    Aug 9, 2012 Reply
  21. Hmmmm…loads of things. Our ’94 Nissan until it finally collapsed on the hwy . Before that, years ago it was a much older Honda. :); Don’t ask what year our current car is 🙂 Hope things get sorted out for you. Sometimes I wonder about putting more money into old cars, but mostly they have served us well and saved us a lot of money.

  22. Well, my husband has repaired our lawnmower about a million times lately.

    Aug 9, 2012 Reply
  23. We just picked a thrown away beach chair and fixed the seat and are using it! 🙂 Way to go on your repair work! 🙂

    Stacy
    Aug 9, 2012 Reply
  24. About a month ago my husband was able to repair our dryer instead of having to buy a new. It came with the house when we bought it 11 years ago and looked old then but I won’t get rid of it until we absolutely have to!

    This isn’t necessarily a repair but this past spring I rescued a vintage dresser from the curb on garbage day and turned it into a buffet!

    Samantha K
    Aug 9, 2012 Reply
  25. I took a bunch of old, worn-out, too-small, wire-popping bras and made them into a bumpy cat bed. There was no way I could have donated them and there wasn’t enough material to make rags or scraps, so it was the only thing I could think to do besides throw them away. When my [male] cats lay on the bed in certain directions, it looks like they have boobs. The bra bed is definitely a conversation piece in my home!

    Aug 9, 2012 Reply
    • Just had to comment: love your story!!

      Ann
      Aug 10, 2012 Reply
  26. The heating element broke in our water heater so my husband bought the part and replaced it himself. We have also repaired our a/c unit instead of replacing it.

    Aug 9, 2012 Reply
  27. We have Kenmore (Amana) Bottom Freezer Refrigerator. Over the past month I noticed my Kenmore refrigerator compressor would run continuously and the refrigerator and freezer were warmer than normal. I noticed a build up of frost on the rear of the bottom mount freezer. I unplugged the refrigerator and left it over night to thaw out and melt the frost. I followed up with a hair dryer to finish off the rest of the frost the following morning. I completely cleaned the the heat-exchanging pipes on the underside of the refrigerator, the rear compressor area, and drip tray. I plugged it back in and the refrigerator and freezer were nice and cold for the next few days. However, as the week progressed the refrigerator and freezer gradually began to get warm and the compressor ran for longer cycles. I repeated the manual defrost process again, but this time I removed the rear wall of the freezer to expose the evaporator coil and it was entirely frosted over and had ice in some areas throughout. The defrost timer appears to be advancing properly as the compressor is turning on and off when it clicks. When I manually advance the defrost timer to turn off the compressor and turn on the defrost heater, it never heats up, and it never melts any frost/ice. I removed the defrost heater and verified it had 35 ohms of resistance (so it was still good). After all my research and troubleshooting the defrost issue seemed to boil down to a bad defrost thermostat. I went ahead and purchased a new defrost thermostat and installed it . At first the defrost heater still wasn’t heating up (well it looks like I need to by a new refrigerator). However, by the next morning the refrigerator was back down to temperature and the defrost thermostat was working like a champ – I avoided throwing away a $2000 refrigerator by replacing a $14.63 part with a little (well a lot) research and troubleshooting. I saved 1 refrigerator from going into the landfill!

    Erik
    Aug 9, 2012 Reply
  28. In our household we always try to reuse and repair. My husband made a K-9 (robot dog from Doctor Who) from scraps we had laying around (90%) He made the antenna ears from coat hangers and autobody mesh. (he is a flower pot). Recently we repaired a resin St. Francis statue that had seen better days. He is gorgeous now. I am on a one year journey to fine and share “green” products that are made in the USA. The facebook page is Greenin RedWhiteBlue if you want ot find some great resuse ideas (as well as “stuff” and good articles I have found.

  29. you probably have considered all your options so this remark may be gratuitous. however, would a new fridge use a lot less energy? if so, purchase a new one may be the best of all the options.

    sharlya gold
    Aug 9, 2012 Reply
    • Just to satisfy your curiosity, the difference is about $50 per year more to keep the old one working.

      Strawesome
      Aug 9, 2012 Reply
  30. Clothing 🙂 Especially the knees in my boys’ pants!!

    Emily
    Aug 9, 2012 Reply
  31. Sorry to hear about your refrigerator! I hope that it all works out!

    Whenever favorite pottery gets chipped or broken, I always pull out the glue. Sometimes the bowls aren’t able to hold water anymore, but I can still use them for holding trinkets, odds, and ends. It means that I don’t have to say goodbye to lovely pieces of art. They can keep serving a purpose and beautifying my home.

    Aug 9, 2012 Reply
  32. I love turning old tshirts into grocery bags. Sew simple and I get a great bag that folds up small, washable, and holds a ton!

    Wendy
    Aug 9, 2012 Reply
  33. Following instructions I found here; http://www.afrotechmods.com/reallycheap/batteries/batts.htm I built a minimal alkaline battery charger. You know those “disposable” AA and AAA batteries? Well, turns out they’re not so disposable after all! I just did this last week and have successfully recharged more than 14 batteries.

    Can’t build your own? Some stores sell units now that even charge C, D, and 9V alkaline batteries. Check NewEgg or eBay!

    Geoff
    Aug 9, 2012 Reply
  34. My dog is recycled she was in 5 homes before we got her seven years ago. She will never be recycled again.

    Amber L
    Aug 9, 2012 Reply
  35. When my youngest outgrew her drop side crib it had become impossible to resell it, and I didn’t feel very good about the idea of passing it on to someone new even if I could find someone who wanted it. Instead, I turned it into an art desk for my daughters and a drying rack! 🙂

    Aug 9, 2012 Reply
  36. i fixed my daughters dress last =0) and hopefully the hubs will be fixing our washer that currently broken :/

    stacy h
    Aug 9, 2012 Reply
  37. I kept a car much longer than I should have for what repairs cost vs. getting a new car. But it was compact, got great gas mileage and was a fun little car.

    Jamie K
    Aug 9, 2012 Reply
  38. I have been repairing my car, as needed, for 18 years. I have a 1989 Toyota. My dad got it in 89, gave it to me in 1994 when I was driving from Florida to California. I have been here ever since, with this car. Still not at 200,000 miles. I’m at about 176,000 miles. I will fix it and keep it as long as I can.

    Ida Friedman
    Aug 9, 2012 Reply
  39. I collect expired car seats and instead of just trashing them, I either tear them apart and take them o they recycle company, or I use then to educate parents on car seat safety. I am a huge car seat freak. Lol. No one rides in my car without a seatbelt or PROPER car seat for each child. And each car seat must be used properly or the car does not move. 😉

    Kasey
    Aug 9, 2012 Reply
  40. My computer is over 10 years old, but I will never throw it out. I don’t replace anything until it breaks or goes out. Some parts are way older than 10 years and I like it that way 😉

    Jen
    Aug 9, 2012 Reply
  41. Well, one day our microwave stopped working and I thought after 4 years, I guess that was it. So glad my husband wasn’t afraid to look into it and take it apart. Turns out a $1.40 capacitor was bad – so he replaced it and we were back in business. And we bought 2 capacitors, so if it ever goes bad again, we will not be without the microwave for long! It showed me if you just look into something and try to fix it….you could save yourself a TON of money!

    Jennifer C.
    Aug 9, 2012 Reply
  42. So sorry about your fridge, but it’s great that you are opting to repair rather than replace it! I have found that the older the item, the better made it is. We have a stove from 1952ish — it even says “Fridgidaire, a General Motors company”. The oven element went out on it last year. We actually found a replacement element 3 states over that shipped for $35 total! Talk about a great deal. We thought for sure we’d have to replace it but with a little time searching on the internet, we saved the cost of a new stove AND helped keep another few hundred pounds of trash out of the landfill. 🙂

    Tara
    Aug 9, 2012 Reply
  43. Instead of replacing our microwave when it stopped working, I unplugged it, then plugged it back in. Voila! Instead of dumping it and buying a new one, we’re still using it.

    Maryellen D.
    Aug 9, 2012 Reply
  44. My best friend broke the zipper on her favorite bag to take to the beach. It told her not to trash it because I knew I could replace the zipper if I wasn’t able to repair it. I was able to repair it and the bag is beach bound once again.

    Jenny
    Aug 9, 2012 Reply
  45. I repaired some rusty old light fixtures when we moved into our new (1950’s) house. I painted them, cleaned them up an remounted them back to their original glory. More of a restoration than a repair, as they weren’t broke, but still more effort than just pickimg up new ones. 🙂

    Amber
    Aug 9, 2012 Reply
  46. I’ve repaired both my washing machine and my refrigerator ice maker myself!. The internet is full of very easy to follow, step-by-step directions which make it simple to fix almost anything.

    Sheila
    Aug 9, 2012 Reply
  47. Our dryer stopped working a few times in the heat last month and hubby told me to look on Craigslist for a replacement. He took the back of the dryer off and found it was a blown fuse. Upon further research, it was an unnecessary part and after removal my dryer works just fine to wall or clothes and cloth items (diapers, napkins, unpaper towels, family cloth, etc)

    April
    Aug 9, 2012 Reply
  48. I totally admire that you are choosing to try repairing over replacing! I agree that the majority of us have become so OK with just replacing stuff, it makes me sad. Also, there is something to be said for repairing a better quality item over replacing it with a “better deal”… where more often than not you end up buying at least a couple of those “better deals” because they don’t last as long; therefore, you really haven’t saved a thing.

    Anyways, I have done a similar thing with my crockpot. I’ve had the thing since college (so over 10 years) and first the handle broke off the lid so I had to screw on a makeshift handle, then the temperature dial broke off so I use pliers to turn the little piece that is left behind. Everyone who sees it always comments asking why I don’t just replace it, but it still works GREAT so why not keep it?! I don’t care that it isn’t as bright and shiny and digital as a new one might be! My crockpot and I have a history and I won’t toss it aside until it has taken it’s last breath ;).

    Aug 9, 2012 Reply
  49. While renting our house a few years ago, the dryer went on the blink. My husband and I thought that surely it could be easily repaired. A weekend later (with a lot of help from a repair store in Canton), it was done. The dryer was as good as new, we knew A LOT more about how dryers work and how to fix them. Our current dryer isn’t drying as well as it should be. Troubleshooting it will take some time, but I see another repair (rather than replace) in our future!!

    Kristin
    Aug 9, 2012 Reply
  50. Your situation opened my eyes to what would I do when our subzero goes out! Our 550 is a 1987 model and my father gave to us as a new home gift…she is still running strong and I hate the thought of dumping her in a landfill also…I appreciate your extended offer of 25% off glass straws. I love my glass straws and people are always commenting on them since they are still throwing straws in the trash! Thanks for opening my mind to what will I do when my fridge craps out.. I too will probably fix her just so I don’t contribute to our overflowing land fills.

    Bonnie
    Aug 10, 2012 Reply
  51. My two faves… my iron coffee table. The glass on my 30 x 30 inch iron coffee table broke. It was the perfect opportunity to change my living room lay out. My ex knew how to weld and made it into a 22 x 38 inch table. I bought a new glass top, spray painted iron frame gold (to cover the weld marks) and voila, a brand spanking new table 🙂 Fast forward 10 years, I moved, had to put my things in storage for one month. When I moved into my new place the glass top was left behind. I bought a piece of plywood and a large piece of 3 inch thick foam which I cut to fit inside the lip of the table, covered it with black and white striped fabric, stapled it to the underside and once again had a new fabulous ottoman/coffee table! I have a pic if you wanna see it 🙂

    debra steinbaugh
    Aug 10, 2012 Reply
  52. We recently repaired our washer. No sure how, but taking it apart and putting it back worked! We also fixed a desk that got mangled in our move. Also, I cleaned up a toaster oven and we still use it rather than replace it. Oh, and thanks for the awesome coupon code. I’ve wanted your straws forever and placed my first order today!

    Andrea Smith
    Aug 10, 2012 Reply
  53. I had a beautiful flower pot that was broken in half but, turned on its side, it make a perfect little toad house and actually has had an occupant in my garden.

    Carol J
    Aug 10, 2012 Reply
  54. Instead of putting our 12 year old couch out to the road, I dyed all of the covers and it’s as good as new 🙂

    Meghan Fuller
    Aug 10, 2012 Reply
  55. I helped my father fix a 1952 jeep. It became the car I learned to drive in.

    Heather
    Aug 10, 2012 Reply
  56. We try to repurpose everything. My old clothes go to my daughter, we plant seeds in our old yogurt containers, 5 gallon buckets have become nesting boxes for our chickens, and an old piece of gutter we made into a fee trough for the chickens and turkeys.

    Melanie
    Aug 10, 2012 Reply
  57. Work is always throwing things away, and I am always looking for items to snag before it goes to the dumpster to repurpose. My latest items have been used insulation I am going to put in the walk-out basement wall, and last week I took home some solid foam packing material and have sewn fabric covers for, and put them in our dogs’ crates =)

    Roseanne
    Aug 10, 2012 Reply
  58. I drank my own pee in the woods.

    Charlie Moyer
    Aug 10, 2012 Reply
  59. I’ve lost count of how many things I’ve repaired over the years. Vehicle repairs to our late model cars, patching/repairing clothing, re-gluing flapping shoe soles back on, tinkering with the computer printer to make it live to print another day, replacing the wiring in an old lamp that was my Grandmother’s, the list goes on.

    Sometimes though, case in point your fridge, it is more cost effective to replace rather than repair. We had a mid-size tube TV with a built-in DVD player that broke; took it in to Best Buy to get a repair estimate and it would have been MORE to repair it rather than purchase a brand new energy-saving flat TV of comparable size. Plus, we’d save lots of money on our electric bill by upgrading. We passed the TV along to friends (only the DVD player was broken).

    Tracy T
    Aug 10, 2012 Reply
  60. We tend not to repair items that are more expensive to maintain, however we always find a new home for them instead of sending them to the dump. Our garage fridge went to a family that didn’t have one for their kitchen. Our low capacity clothes washer went to a friend with a rental apartment when we needed to upgrade for a family of four. Our dishwasher stayed and after it didn’t work any better after the repairman left my husband pulled it out and fixed it himself!

    Alison Minor
    Aug 10, 2012 Reply
  61. Our stove! It kept beeping at all hours and was super loud (couldn’t be easily ignored) . My husband figured out how to disable the sound so we could keep it! Only downfall is that the timer no longer works but that is no biggie.

    Jesika
    Aug 10, 2012 Reply
  62. We have an A. O. Smith Conservationist hot water heater that we purchased several years ago. At the time, it had a kilowatt hours per year usage estimate that was below the lowest on the U.S. government Energy Guide that came with the water heater. Just this week, it stopped producing any hot water (this was the third time in the life of the appliance). The plumbing service that came out to our house, brought a new hot water heater, in case they were unable to repair it or in case they believed we would continue to have problems with it.

    We said that we would like to repair it, if at all possible, rather than replace it with a new one. The plumber replaced the two elements as well as the two thermostats, and we now have hot water. Cost us $232, but we still believe this is preferable to replacing it with a new one.

    Glenn Ellen
    Aug 10, 2012 Reply
  63. I reuse or repair anything I can. Mostly when it comes to clothing or household items. I get out the sewing box or machine to repair or change clothing items. We even use 5 gallon muffin buckets from my mom’s work when we go collect spring water. And instead of buying a couch we are going to build one using reclaimed wood and then I’ll make cushions for it. The same goes for a new bed frame for my room where I’m going to use untreated wood pallets for the frame and old doors for the headboard.

    Meghan W.
    Aug 10, 2012 Reply
  64. I repaired the wooden arm of a chair that I found left on the sidewalk as trash. I have had the chair in my living room for over 10 years!

    Kamala Raab
    Aug 10, 2012 Reply
  65. Plants! I was at our local nursery last week and they had some sad tomato plants that had not been watered for a few days. They just gave them to me. I planted and watered them and now we have tomatoes on almost all of the plants!

    Aug 11, 2012 Reply
  66. I’m really big on reuse. I save jars and burn a hole through the lids with a wood burner to fit a glass straw. I do that with glass soda bottles and their tops (screw on type). I also save plastic lids like to bread crumb canisters, marshmallow creme canisters, Pringles canisters… you get the idea. Then I match those lids up to different glasses and make my own lidded drink containers. I particularly love the pretty Mason jars pasta sauces come in. My Vegemite lids and jars make great drink containers, etc…. one of my Vegemite lids fits the pasta sauce Mason jars. I saw these “Redneck Soda Glass sets with basically the same concept. $20 retail! Ha! I get the jar I would have thrown out, match up a screw top lid; burn a hole through the top to accommodate a glass straw and voila! Redneck Soda Glass! I have a SodaStream machine so it sort of goes hand in hand with my sparkling water habit! xo Kath

    Aug 11, 2012 Reply
  67. We have repaired or repurposed several pieces of furniture from my childhood, instead of throwing them out, sometimes all it takes is a little carpenters glue and a fresh coat of paint. we’ve also brought back broken furniture that some has left at the town dump and repaired it like new! My son’s entire bedroom set came from the dump! We later donated it to charity when he left for college. We also have repaired our washer and dryer several times instead of replacing them. I joke with my husband about how long he’s kept those two appliances running!

    Coco
    Aug 11, 2012 Reply
  68. I have a doll from my childhood that I’ve been saving to give to my daughters to play with. She is similar in size to the American Girl dolls that are so popular now. My older daughter found the doll tucked away in my closet and asked to play with it, which I was happy to let her. She asked if it was an American Girrl doll, to which I said no. She said well this doll was better because it was free and we didn’t have to spend lots of money to buy her. Yesss! Score one for being able to instill the value of not having to buy the newest shiny toy or product out there.

    Melinda
    Aug 11, 2012 Reply
  69. We rescued a ceramic elephant planter from our neighbor’s garbage pile. It was chipped on the top edge of the planter, so my husband trimmed & sanded it & now it looks like new.

    Andrea
    Aug 11, 2012 Reply
  70. Just yesterday I repaired a blouse that I hadn’t worn in so long that I was thinking about getting rid of it – I just decided to fix it up and keep it! My sweet husband is also a great repurposer. Among other things, he rescues damaged LP albums and uses them in his art projects!

    AJ
    Aug 11, 2012 Reply
  71. I once save a very tangled up gold chain. Now I know that these can be melted down by a jeweler and then made into a nice new piece of jewelry, but I didnt want to part with it. It took me about 2 hrs to untangle this 20″ gold chain. I used tweezers and all my patience to do it and was proud of myself.

    Julianna
    Aug 11, 2012 Reply
  72. The drum in my dryer stopped working. I got a new belt and repaired it with my dad’s help.

    joeynumber41
    Aug 12, 2012 Reply
  73. Instead of throwing out an old piece of wood, my artist daughter painted a beautiful picture of my sweet cat who passed away a few years ago on it. I now have it hanging in my bedroom! I love it.

    Maryann D.
    Aug 12, 2012 Reply
  74. We have a recycled dog that we got from the shelter, we don’t believe in buying new in that department.:) we also have repaired our marriage when at one point I came very close to throwing it away. With a lot of work the relationship is in close to perfect working order now.:)

    Patty
    Aug 12, 2012 Reply
  75. I save all our egg cartons and toilet paper rolls to make things out of – anything from crafts to bird feeders! If we don’t use them all, I donate the rest to daycare to use for crafts.

    Aug 12, 2012 Reply
  76. I had a pair of jeans that got a hole in them . Instead of throwing them away I put a piece of fabric under the hole and sewed it….they turned out pretty nice 🙂

    Tracie Brown
    Aug 12, 2012 Reply
  77. My kids wear holes in the knees of their pants all the time. If they still fit, I cut them off and hem them into shorts. If they are too small for the youngest child, I still cut them off and hem them before I donate them, to keep them usable and keep them out of the landfill.

    Katherine
    Aug 12, 2012 Reply
  78. I repaired my relationship with my boyfriend. We’ve now been married 6 years and have two wonderful children.

    Theresa G
    Aug 17, 2012 Reply
  79. We moved into a house with a 25+ year-old washing machine and an equally old dryer. The washer basket looked so rusty I wondered whether we were going to have to ditch it right away for a new one. We did many loads of laundry in it, only to have rusty circle spots from the sides of the basket on all the laundry, especially noticeable on the whites. Then one morning, it occurred to me to spritz the entire basket with one of those multi purpose rust/lime removers. Waddayaknow. All the rust dribbled down revealing a pristine white basket. Years of rusty water had merely stained the basket. Old appliance, live on!

    Katherine
    Aug 20, 2012 Reply
  80. […] really wish more appliances had a lifetime guarantee. We just moved into a new house and the appliances are so old that I wish the large investment could allow for updated appliances when they reach a certain age, […]

  81. Hello,
    This Recycling process is so useful to peoples.We can recycle our old things like toys,different bottles etc.Also the recycling system is Eco-friendly.
    Fuller Recycler

    Oct 23, 2013 Reply

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